Recent Posts

Effective strategies for rebutting science denialism in public discussions

Scientists are often asked to engage in public discourse as a way to counteract science denialism, but it’s not always clear if their efforts can change minds. A new study by Schmid and Betsch suggests that efforts to rebut are worthwhile. They showed subjects videos with climate denial messages about…

Using “Scientists Who Selfie” to disrupt stereotypes of scientists (PLOS One)

Public engagement has been a long-term challenge for scientists. The rise of social media has generated a novel avenue for connecting with a wider audience; however, many scientists walk a fine line between being personal and professional, often posting images of their work but not themselves. A recent…

Scientific communication in a post-truth society (PNAS)

I think most scientists are occasionally exasperated when confronted with statements that clearly contradict what we know to be true, whether the topic is climate change, vaccine safety or biotechnology. Iyengar and Massey argue that the persistence of these flawed ideas is not due to a lack of positive…

Scientists on Twitter: Preaching to the choir or singing from the rooftops?

Science communication is as old as science itself, reaching even best-selling levels with some extraordinary examples such as “On the Origin of Species” by Charles Darwin or “A Brief History of Time: From the Big Bang to Black Holes” by Stephen Hawking. Currently, and thanks to social media,…

Ten simple rules for drawing scientific comics

PLOS Comp. Biol. No doubt, science communication is a struggle for many scientists and science institutions. There is an increasing need to improve public science understanding and/or engagement. Good science communication is crucial to help recruit next generation scientist, highlight science’s role…